The Canada Milton Seminar XIV, 10-11 May 2019

The Canada Research Chair Program, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies and Department of English at the University of Toronto present the Canada Milton Seminar XIVMay 10-11, 2019.

Speakers include Ian Balfour, Achsah Gubbory, Hannibal Hamlin, John Rogers, David Adkins, Sam Fallon, Lynne Greenberg, and Jan Purnis. For details and to register please visit crrs.ca/CMS2019

CRRS Website (crrs.ca/CMS2019)

Facebook event

Registration (cms2019.eventbrite.ca)

For further information, please contact:

Paul Stevens at paul.stevens@utoronto.ca

or Natalie Oeltjen at crrs@vicu.utoronto.ca

 

 

 

 

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Society for Neo-Latin Studies: Annual Lecture, 23 November 2018

Professor Sarah Knight (University of Leicester):

Surge, age surge: the Latin Writing of London Students’

November 23, 5.00-6:30 p.m.

The Lecture Room, Westminster School, Little Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PF

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, every author who went on to write in English studied Latin at school, learning how to compose, imitate, translate, declaim and debate: academic success fundamentally rested on a student’s facility and confidence in using and understanding Latin. I will consider how textbook marginalia, institutional poetry anthologies and published orations all help illuminate how Latin was taught and which aspects of language-learning were particularly encouraged. My exploration of London student life will include the two prominent early seventeenth-century examples of George Herbert, who attended Westminster School, and John Milton, who studied at St Paul’s School. Both Herbert and Milton then became undergraduates at Cambridge, and the subject of educational experience continued to be of interest to them both in their Latin and subsequent vernacular writing.

This talk will examine how young men educated in London during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries represented their Latin education, in works written both while they were still students and after they had left the institutions of learning. I will show how their imaginative and intellectual formation and Latin writing were shaped by the places where they studied, by the people who taught them, and by the powerful courtiers, politicians and scholars who had influenced the institutions they attended. Humanist schools offered many writers the chance to conduct their first literary experiments in this institutionally mediated language, and the move from school to university encouraged them to further develop their Latin-speaking voices.

If you would like to attend, please register here by 19 November 2018: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/snls/news/agm/registration2018

The International Milton Symposium (IMS12), Strasbourg, France, 17-21 June 2019: proposal due date December 1, 2018

The IMS12 solicits 200 word-paper proposals, with a short bibliography to be sent to ims12proposals@gmail.com . See webpage http://ims12.unistra.fr .
Proposal due date is 1 December 2018. Early submissions welcome: you will get a response from the Committee within a month. 
Strasbourg is home to the European Parliament and the carefully-chosen symposium dates correspond with the absence of any Parliamentary meetings. There are 78 hotels and 4747 rooms available in Strasbourg! We have special conference rates, but if you book very early, much ahead of the conference, you can get even lower rates.
The Symposium will be held at the Palais Universitaire, which is just across the river by the City, where most of the hotels are located. Hence they are all within walking distance. The closest is Regent Contades, at a stone’s throw (350 meters), and one of the farthest is Regent Petite-France (2 km). Depending on how fit you are, they can be reached within 5 to 20 minutes.

BMS Spring Meeting 2019: Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Spring 2019 meeting of the British Milton Seminar will be held on Saturday 16 March 2019.

Venue: TBC.  There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.

We currently intend that each session will have two papers (of approx. 25-30 minutes each), for which proposals are invited.

Please send proposals to Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk) and Professor Sarah Knight (sk218@leicester.ac.uk) by no later than 31 January 2019.

Hugh Adlington and Sarah Knight

Joint Conveners

British Milton Seminar, 20 October 2018: Programme

BMS 58

Saturday 20 October 2018

Venue: University of Birmingham, Edgbaston campus (Rodney Hilton Library: Room 335, Arts Building) – please below for directions.

There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.

Programme:

11.00-12.30

Mario Murgia (National Autonomous University of Mexico), ‘“He also saw rich Mexico.” A 19th-century, Spanish-speaking John Milton’;

Nick McDowell (Exeter), ‘Refining the Sublime: Edward Phillips and the Failure of a Miltonic Education’.

2.00-4.00

Robert Stagg (Oxford), ‘Milton’s “bondage of rhyming”: a longer history’;

Rosamund Paice (Portsmouth), ‘Gardeners’ World: Companionship and Retreat in Milton’s Eden’.

Directions

The Rodney Hilton Library (Room 335) is on the third floor of the Arts Building on the Edgbaston campus of the University of Birmingham.

For directions to the Edgbaston campus, please see: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/contact/directions/getting-here-edgbaston.aspx

For a map of the Edgbaston campus (the Arts Building is marked as R16), please see: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/Documents/university/edgbaston-campus-map.pdf

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either:

Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk) or Professor Sarah Knight (sk218@leicester.ac.uk).

Hugh Adlington and Sarah M. Knight (Co-convenors)

Public lecture: Seeing Milton’s Voice: Illustrations to Paradise Lost; a social history of Great Britain

Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE.

Free public lecture. 06 November, 2018:  13.00-14.00

https://www.sal.org.uk/events/2018/11/seeing-miltons-voice/

Seeing Milton’s Voice

Illustrations to Paradise Lost; a social history of Great Britain

Howard JM Hanley, FSA

Sadly, John Milton’s Paradise Lost is now a classic; the kiss of death! But not always. Quite the contrary, for Paradise Lost was in almost every English household for more than 200 years after its publication in 1667 with hundreds of editions published, at least sixty between about 1770 and 1825 alone. The publishers made Milton a Personality: a figure larger than life who fought battles for the common man and whose English prickliness acted as a bulwark against decadent, dangerously Catholic, continental Europe. To lower the bar, Milton emerged as a patron saint of marriage (despite his record on that score), and was cited as an authority on landscape gardening, cookery, astronomy and military equipment. And to lower the bar further, Paradise Lost was so well-known that John Cleland could quote from it in his lascivious, pornographic Fanny Hill.

The idea of the lecture is to show how this publication phenomenon came about and how it gave rise to an astonishing outpouring of Miltonic themes in the visual arts, of which the illustrations to Paradise Lost were a major segment. Moreover, the evolution of the illustrations’ iconography reflects a history of what people thought of themselves as society moved from the gothic age to the industrial age. The work of many artists – including Hogarth, Turner, John Martin, Fuseli, Romney and Blake – make this point.

Lecture begins at 13.00. Doors open at 12.30.

Public Lectures are free and open to the public, but space is limited and reservations are strongly recommended. To book online, simply open the link https://www.sal.org.uk/events/2018/11/seeing-miltons-voice/ and click Reserve [https://www.sal.org.uk/events/booking/?id=16545].

British Milton Seminar, 20 October 2018: Programme

BMS 58

Saturday 20 October 2018

Venue: University of Birmingham, Edgbaston campus (Rodney Hilton Library: Room 335, Arts Building) – please below for directions.

There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.

Programme:

11.00-12.30

Mario Murgia (National Autonomous University of Mexico), ‘“He also saw rich Mexico.” A 19th-century, Spanish-speaking John Milton’;

Nick McDowell (Exeter), ‘Refining the Sublime: Edward Phillips and the Failure of a Miltonic Education’.

2.00-4.00

Robert Stagg (Oxford), ‘Milton’s “bondage of rhyming”: a longer history’;

Rosamund Paice (Portsmouth), ‘Gardeners’ World: Companionship and Retreat in Milton’s Eden’.

Directions

The Rodney Hilton Library (Room 315) is on the third floor of the Arts Building on the Edgbaston campus of the University of Birmingham.

For directions to the Edgbaston campus, please see: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/contact/directions/getting-here-edgbaston.aspx

For a map of the Edgbaston campus (the Arts Building is marked as R16), please see: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/Documents/university/edgbaston-campus-map.pdf

For further information about the British Milton Seminar, please contact either:

Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.uk) or Professor Sarah Knight (sk218@leicester.ac.uk).

Hugh Adlington and Sarah M. Knight (Co-convenors)

University of Toronto, 17th Century English Literature – Canada Research Chair (Associate / Full Professor)

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

17th Century English Literature – Canada Research Chair (Associate / Full Professor)

The Department of English at the University of Toronto, St George campus, invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment in the field of 17th Century Literature and Culture; a strong interest in Milton would be an advantage. The appointment will be at the rank of Associate or Full Professor and will begin on July 1, 2019.

Please click below for further details:

17th Century English Literature – Job 1803203

BMS Autumn Meeting 2018: Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Autumn 2018 meeting of the British Milton Seminar will be held in Birmingham on Saturday 20 October 2018.

Venue: TBC.  There will be two sessions, from 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, and from 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.

We currently intend that each session will have two papers (of approx. 25-30 minutes each), for which proposals are invited.

Please send proposals to Professor Sarah Knight (sk218@leicester.ac.uk) and/or Dr Hugh Adlington (h.c.adlington@bham.ac.ukby no later than 31 August 2018.

Hugh Adlington and Sarah Knight

Joint Conveners

Barbara Kiefer Lewalski, 1931-2018

We pass on the sad news that Barbara Kiefer Lewalski, renowned Miltonist and William R. Kenan, Jr. Research Professor of History and English Literature at Harvard University from 1983 to 2010, passed away on Friday 2nd March.

Messages of condolence can be sent to her son,

David Lewalski

166 University Avenue

Providence, RI 02906 USA

Contributions in her memory can be made to Doctors Without Borders or the Rhode Island Philharmonic. Barbara also supported the Southern Poverty Law Center, ACLU, and Planned Parenthood.

A remembrance service is planned for Monday, March 12, at 4:00 p.m., at Monahan, Drabble and Sherman Funeral Home, 230 Waterman Street, Providence RI.  Calling hours are from 1-4.